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Easter Egg Hunt Game

Summary

A fantastic game to work on Coordinates for Easter!

Easter Egg Hunt!

By Karen Go Soco

A game for 2 players

This game gives practise of using co-ordinates in the first quadrant. It is based on the popular game of Battleships.

You will need:

Before playing, download the pdf

Easter egg hunt 1

Then cut out the 2 co-ordinate grids, 3 rabbit pieces and 4 egg pieces for each player.

Extra pieces are included for the variations of the game.

How to play:

Each player chooses where to place their rabbits and eggs on their first grid, keeping this hidden from the other player. Each egg takes up 2 squares and each rabbit takes up 6 squares and both can be positioned either horizontally or vertically, but not diagonally.

Player 1 chooses a square by saying its co-ordinates or how many squares along, then how many squares up – the phrase ‘along the corridor then up the stairs’ is often used to remember to move horizontally first. Player 2 checks that square on their first grid and says either empty, egg or rabbit, according to what is in that position. Player 1 marks the same square on their second grid, with a cross if empty or an appropriate letter or symbol if it contains an egg or rabbit. When a player finds both squares covered by an egg, or all 6 squares covered by a rabbit, they may claim that piece from their opponent.

Players continue to take turns making guesses and recording the results until one player has found all of the rabbits and eggs.

Variations

Play with just egg or rabbit pieces, or alter the number of each piece used as you wish.

Play with Easter chocolates for even more fun!

For more great games ideas visit Karen’s website –

https://www.fixitmaths.com/




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